How much should you spend on Mother’s Day gifts?

Canadian spend an average of $87 to $155 on their mom, a consumer survey suggests

Even though most moms say they just want to spend time with their family, the average Canadian will spend an average of at least $87 on a Mother’s Day gift.

According to a survey conducted by RetailMeNot.ca, about 85 per cent of Canadian moms said they wouldn’t be upset if their kids skipped the presents.

But that’s not stopping children from spending $87 to $155 to show their appreciation, the survey says.

Respondents said some of their typical purchases are:

  • Dinner – $72
  • Experiences together – $70
  • Gift card – $55
  • Flowers – $36
  • Chocolate or candy – $20
  • Card – $12

And for those who might not have the cash to spare and are going the homemade route: 97 per cent of moms said kids don’t have to break the bank to make them feel special, and that “it’s the thought that counts.”


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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