Consider This: Canadian democracy isn’t really democracy

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Vladimir Certik believes that thinking outside the box and engaging fellow citizens may bring simple solutions to complex problems. The West Creston resident can be reached at 250-402-0055.

Vladimir Certik believes that thinking outside the box and engaging fellow citizens may bring simple solutions to complex problems. The West Creston resident can be reached at 250-402-0055.

The thing we erroneously call democracy is a scam. It fleeces those who really work, gives tax holidays to big corporations and the elite, and allows systemic abuse by lifetime welfare recipients and big unions. As it stands, it bankrupts the country and will eventually implode. Ironically, a host of well-known historical figures, including James Madison and John Adams, shared this view.

Adams said, “Democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts and murders itself. There was never a democracy that did not commit suicide.”

In Greece, Syriza, a coalition of 14 parties and independent individuals, has become the strongest opposition party. In Slovenia, tens of thousands of people hit the streets shouting, “It is enough! They are done! They are all crooks!”

Many Irish refuse to pay new taxes and take the banks to court in connection with fraudulent mortgages. New parties are emerging.

The Italian Five Star Movement turned politics as usual upside down. Uncorrupted, popular and refusing to go into coalition with any major party, it is on the top with 25 per cent of votes.

Ex-comedian Beppe Grillo, their popular face, says that the traditional parties are corrupt to the core and have to go, cuts on health and education should be reversed, and requests a clampdown on financial speculation and corporate greed (and politicians being involved with corporations).

In usual de-mock-racy, puppet masters infiltrate major parties (or create ones), give us a “choice” of electing one of their buffoons (clowns or sold-out politicos, if you prefer), set them at the trough and keep them untouchable for as long as they are useful and obedient.

Is there a way out? Yes, there is.

Look at Switzerland. Politicians are the servants of the people. There is no coalition or opposition. Leading parties have the right and obligation to chose the best leaders for each post. They have seven ministers, with one of them as a president. They are accountable. Laws passed can be overturned by binding referendums. Even the constitution can be changed by referendum only. Voters can add any candidates or exclude one or all on the ballot. There is no five per cent threshold.

The Swiss have the highest worldwide long term government approval (75 to 80 per cent). Unemployment is three per cent and wages are, well, the Swiss ones.

We have unusable, anti-democratic rules. It is a game with the same outcome — always against the majority of decent, hard-working people. Why don’t we try Swiss model — and improve it? How?

Pass the law that if a politician lies in the campaign and turns coat after elected, he gets a minimum of five years of prison — you know how keen Harper and Conservatives were to parrot “You do the crime, you do the time,” don’t you?

Give MPs an average wage, no golden parachutes, no fat pensions after eight years, no special privileges and retirement at 67.

Get three to 10 MLAs for provinces and 13 MPs for Ottawa (one for each province and territory). Abolish the Senate — it is filled with impotent cronies anyway.

If I do not vote, as many fellow Canadians with a spine do, it is my way of saying, “Not in my name, parasites.” Politicos, does this offend you? It offends me to see many lives wasted, dreams stolen, families broken, small businesses struggling, students and homeowners in debt up to their eyeballs, health care and education in shambles, and the country, provinces and municipalities indebted, all just because it is politics as usual.

Vladimir Certik believes that thinking outside the box and engaging fellow citizens may bring simple solutions to complex problems. The West Creston resident can be reached at 250-402-0055.