Tories, Libs fight over costs of climate action in election-campaign preview

The Tories began this week taking aim at a Liberal plan to introduce a clean-fuel standard

Tories, Libs fight over costs of climate action in election-campaign preview

A day after Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer accused the Liberals of plotting to levy a “secret fuel tax” on families, seniors and farmers, the Liberals volleyed back with allegations the Tories have nothing but smears to offer in place of a real climate-change plan.

The federal election is still three months away but both parties seem happy to have this fight. The Liberals are betting that Canadian voters want potent policies to cut greenhouse-gas emissions. The Conservatives are betting that those same voters don’t want to pay too much for them.

The Tories began this week taking aim at a Liberal plan to introduce a clean-fuel standard, which will force cleaner-burning fuels in order to lower overall carbon emissions by 30 million tonnes a year.

Initially, the Conservatives planned to issue a letter from MPs Shannon Stubbs and Ed Fast to Environment Minister Catherine McKenna questioning a lack of detail from the Liberals about how much the fuel standards will affect gasoline prices.

ALSO READ: MPs not running again will get paid around $1.6 million in severance

But by Monday, the party decided to take a harder stance. Instead, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer issued an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau branding the new standard a secret fuel tax and promising to scrap it entirely if his party wins the fall election.

In his letter, Scheer invoked images of everyday Canadians paying more to live their daily lives — moms and dads driving their kids to soccer practice; seniors going to doctors’ appointments; farmers planting their crops.

“Your secret fuel tax will undoubtedly increase the cost of gasoline by at least another four cents a litre, a fact you continue to hide,” Scheer charged in his letter.

Later on Monday, a group of Conservative premiers took over, gathering in Alberta ahead of the “council of the federation” meeting in Saskatoon, to voice their continued opposition to the Liberal carbon-pricing plan and frustration at being “dictated to by Ottawa,” as Alberta Premier Jason Kenney put it.

Then the federal Liberals fought back.

Calling journalists to the national press theatre in Ottawa, Liberal MPs Sean Fraser and Mona Fortier accused Conservative leaders of embracing policies that amount to “anti-climate action” heading into the federal election campaign.

Certain conservative premiers are spending millions in taxpayers’ money vainly trying to fight the federal government’s right to charge for carbon emissions — a right recently upheld by two court rulings in Ontario and Saskatchewan, Fraser told reporters Tuesday.

“We’ve seen conservatives like Doug Ford and Jason Kenney continue to oppose common-sense solutions that we know are the most effective ways to fight climate change and the most inexpensive as well,” Fraser said.

“The fact is they would rather silence their critics, muzzle scientists as they did under Stephen Harper, and launch lawsuits or smear campaigns rather than actually present opposing views or ideas that will help reduce our emissions in a responsible way.”

Andrew Scheer is no different, he added, accusing Scheer of “trying to scare and mislead Canadians against taking climate action.”

He took strong issue with Scheer calling the Liberal plan for a clean-fuel standard a “secret fuel tax.” It’s a regulation limiting the carbon emissions from fuels, not a tax, he said.

“To describe it otherwise is, frankly, misleading and dishonest.”

However, Fraser would not say how much the new standard might affect prices at the pumps.

In April, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce said that a federal carbon price and a clean-fuels standard amounted to “double-dipping” by charging businesses twice for every tonne of emissions. The chamber estimated that by 2025, the clean-fuel standard would add 1.5 cents to a litre of gasoline and 3.7 cents for a litre of diesel.

In a cost-benefit analysis released by Environment Canada in February, the department acknowledged the costs of implementing the standard would likely be passed on to consumers, households and industrial users. But the analysis did not suggest what that cost would be.

A draft of the regulations isn’t expected until 2020, with rules for liquid fuels to apply in 2022. Standards for gaseous and solid fuels would follow.

Fraser said the details are still being discussed with provinces, territories and the public and this input could lead to “tweaks” to ensure prices remain affordable for all Canadians.

“This is not some sort of electionary trickery. This is good governance, this is going out and actually having conversations with Canadians and working with provinces and territories to implement a plan that works and will be done in a way that’s affordable for households.”

The Conservatives were swift in their next attack, accusing the Liberals of deliberately evading a clear answer on the clean-fuel costs.

“Despite repeated questions, even today, the Trudeau Liberals still refuse to come clean about how much this secret fuel tax will cost Canadians,” Ed Fast, the party’s environment critic, said in a statement Tuesday.

Fraser later took to social media to express his frustration over the Conservatives’ stance on climate issues.

“I’m tired of some Conservative politicians opposing serious action on climate change. In the 21st century, Canadians expect a real plan to combat climate change, not court battles and wasted taxpayer dollars.”

Teresa Wright, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

federal election 2019

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Zaudanawng “Jay-Dan” Maran in his Creston home. Hanging on the wall behind him is a logo of Kachin’s Manaw festival. Photo: Aaron Hemens
From Myanmar to Creston: The story of a refugee

In October 2007, Zaudanawng “Jay-Dan” Maran and his friends encountered a woman being sexually assaulted by two Myanmar soldiers.

Creston RCMP detachment. Photo: Aaron Hemens
Creston RCMP Report: 61 calls for assistance from Jan. 18 to 25

On Jan. 24, police were called to the Kingsgate port of entry after an American driver was suspected of being impaired after crashing his truck into a cement barrier.

The trial of Harry Richardson began Monday at the Nelson courthouse. File photo
Trial of man accused of shooting RCMP officer near Argenta in 2019 begins

Harry Richardson is facing five charges in a Nelson courtroom

Gerald Cordeiro of Kalesnikoff Lumber Ltd. says the company is looking for a non-profit organization to take over and run its proposed agroforestry project. Photo: Bill Metcalfe
Logging company proposes agroforestry project for Nelson area

Kalesnikoff Lumber is floating the idea of growing trees in conjunction with food crops

Creston Fire Rescue insignia. File photo
Creston Fire Rescue Report: 8 calls for service from Jan. 18 to 24

During this period, firefighters assisted paramedics with five different calls for patient care and medical aid

Crews with Discovery Channel film as an Aggressive Towing driver moves a Grumman S2F Tracker aircraft around a 90-degree turn from its compound and onto the road on Saturday, Jan. 23, 2021. It was the “most difficult” part of the move for the airplane, one organizer said. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: Vintage military plane gets towed from Chilliwack to Greater Victoria

Grumman CP-121 Tracker’s eventual home the British Columbia Aviation Museum on Vancouver Island

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry talk about the next steps in B.C.’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday, January 22, 2021. Two more cases of the COVID-19 strain first identified in South Africa have been diagnosed in British Columbia, bringing the total to three as of Jan. 16.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. now has three cases of South African COVID-19 variant, six of U.K. strain

Both variants are thought to spread faster than earlier strains

Rodney and Ekaterina Baker in an undated photo from social media. The couple has been ticketed and charged under the Yukon’s <em>Civil Emergency Measures Act</em> for breaking isolation requirements in order to sneak into a vaccine clinic and receive Moderna vaccine doses in Beaver Creek. (Facebook/Submitted)
Great Canadian Gaming CEO resigns after being accused of sneaking into Yukon for vaccine

Rod Baker and Ekaterina Baker were charged with two CEMA violations each

Police discovered a makeshift nightclub in a Vancouver apartment on Jan. 23, 2021, and say it wasn’t the first time this month officers have been called to the unit over social gathering concerns. (Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
Doorman of makeshift ‘booze-can’ in Vancouver apartment fined; police look to court order

This marks the fourth complaint about social gatherings inside the apartment in January

A Kelowna couple welcomed their Nooner baby in December. (Flytographer)
Kelowna couple welcomes baby girl from Hotel Zed Nooner campaign

Nicole and Alex will now have 18 years of free stays at the hotel

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Kyrell Sopotyk was drafted by the Kamloops Blazers in 2016 and played two seasons with the Western Hockey League club. (Photograph By ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW)
Kamloops Blazer paralyzed in snowboarding accident sparks fundraiser for family

As of Jan. 24, more than $68,000 had been raised to help Kamloops Blazers’ forward Kyrell Sopotyk

(Pixhere photo)
B.C. dentists argue for COVID-19 vaccine priority after ‘disappointing’ exclusion from plan

Vaccines are essential for dentists as patients cannot wear masks during treatment, argues BCDA

The fine for changing lanes or merging over a solid line costs drivers $109 and two penalty points in B.C. (Screenshot via Google Street View)
B.C. drivers caught crossing, merging over solid white lines face hefty fine

Ticket for $109, two penalty points issued under Motor Vehicle Act for crossing solid lines

Most Read