File photo of a B.C. Wildfire

Province has acted on 92% of wildfire, flood response recommendations

Ninety-nine of the 108 recommendations made in the Abbott-Chapman report have been acted on

The B.C. government says it has addressed all but nine recommendations made in an external report that looked into how the province could have been better prepared after the devastating 2017 wildfire and flood season.

Ninety-nine of the 108 recommendations made in the report have been acted on, Forest Minister Doug Donaldson said in the province’s second progress update on its action plan for responding to natural disasters Thursday.

Of the remaining nine, four require further analysis and discussion, the update said, and five are being addressed using alternative approaches.

In 2017, 1.2 million hectares of forest burned, displacing more than 65,000 residents during the longest state of emergency in B.C.’s history. The annual total cost of wildfire and flood response was close to $650 million.

“We were all aware of the risk of catastrophic wildfires leading up to 2017, but at that time, not enough work was done to prepare people and communities,” Donaldson said.

ALSO READ: Universities in B.C., Alberta to study mental and physical health of wildfire crews

In December that year, the province launched an independent review of its response, to be led by George Abbott, a former Liberal cabinet minister, and Maureen Chapman, hereditary chief of Skawahlook First Nation in the Fraser Valley.

The report, released last year, made it clear that the province needed to improve how it prevents, prepares for, responds to and recovers from wildfires and floods, George Abbott said in the news release.

“Chief Maureen Chapman and I spent months travelling around the province last year in the wake of the 2017 wildfire and freshet seasons,” Abbott said in a statement.

“We listened very closely to the concerns of many individuals and communities who were directly affected by those catastrophic events.”

The province said next steps include new emergency management legislation and a climate preparedness strategy.

READ MORE: B.C. to overhaul emergency procedures for wildfires, floods


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Krafty Kronys disband after 14 years of service

Krafty Kronys has been raising funds for the Therapeutic Activation Program for… Continue reading

Creston RCMP assisted with seizure of cannabis from school property

Police assisted with seizure of cannabis from school property

Footlighters ringing in season with White Christmas

Submitted by Footlighters Theatre Society High-energy tap dancing. Classic Irving Berlin songs… Continue reading

Columbia River Treaty: ‘It is going to get tough’

B.C. negotiator tells Nelson meeting that talks are cordial, so far

WildSafeBC reminds East Kootenay residents to give deer space during rut

Be cautious when driving as well, says WildSafeBC

VIDEO: ‘Climate emergency’ is Oxford’s 2019 Word of the Year

Other words on the shortlist included ‘extinction,’ ‘climate denial’ and ‘eco-anxiety’

Canucks erupt with 5 power-play goals in win over Nashville

Vancouver ends three-game slide with 6-3 triumph over Predators

65-million-year-old triceratops makes its debut in Victoria

Dino Lab Inc. is excavating the fossilized remains of a 65-million-year-old dinosaur

B.C. widow suing health authority after ‘untreatable’ superbug killed her husband

New Public Agency Health report puts Canadian death toll at 5,400 in 2018

Changes to B.C. building code address secondary suites, energy efficiency

Housing Minister Selina Robinson says the changes will help create more affordable housing

Security guard at Kamloops music festival gets three years for sexually assaulting concertgoer

Shawn Christopher Gray walked the woman home after she became seperated from her friends, court heard

Algae bloom killing farmed fish on Vancouver Island’s West Coast

DFO says four Cermaq Canada salmon farms affected, fish not infectious

Most Read