BC Cannabis Store in Kamloops. (Black Press Media file)

Manufacturer says cannabis spray that left B.C. woman ‘paranoid’ wasn’t mislabelled

Producer claims the sprays that were sold had CBD, not THC

  • Feb. 12, 2019 12:35 p.m.

Kamloops This Week

An allegedly mislabelled cannabis product at the centre of a Kamloops woman’s lawsuit has not yet been tested.

Kimberly Webster, a 27-year-old student at Thompson Rivers University, claims her use last year of a mislabeled CBD spray left her “unable to perform her duties” in school.

Webster purchased the product from the government-run B.C. Cannabis Store in Kamloops on Oct. 18, one day after recreational marijuana became legal in Canada.

She said she received an email days after her purchase advising her that the product was mislabelled.

That correspondence was followed up by another email stating the issue was resolved prior to purchase and all products sold were properly labelled by manufacturer Hexo Operations.

Webster filed her lawsuit in November, claiming Hexo was “negligent in failing to warn the plaintiff” about potential effects of their product.

Webster believed she was purchasing a product high in CBD and low in THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis. She claims in her lawsuit that what she received was the opposite.

READ MORE: B.C. woman files lawsuit after high-THC cannabis product mislabelled

In November, Webster told KTW she used the product as a form of research for an academic paper about labelling on recreational cannabis.

“We decided we would taste it and it just kind of went from there,” she said. “We couldn’t stop laughing for anything. Everyone thought we were crazy. I started feeling anxious and, at one point, I was scared of a couch, which is strange.”

An amended notice of claim filed late last month paints a clearer picture of Webster’s allegations.

“Kimberly consumed the CBD oral spray as per the recommended use and experienced an unexpected result,” it states. “The result was that Kimberly became paranoid, distressed and anxious.”

Dustin Gagnon, Webster’s lawyer, told KTW in November the product purchased by his client would undergo testing to determine its true contents. Gagnon said that testing has not yet taken place.

Terry Lake, vice-president of Hexo Corporation, told KTW in December that his company’s staffers noticed a discrepancy in their warehouse after sending a shipment of CBD spray to government-owned B.C. Cannabis.

“We sent a shipment to the LDB (B.C. Liquor Distribution Branch, which also distributes cannabis) and, shortly thereafter, it was discovered there were six bottles in our processing area that should have gone out with that shipment,” Lake said, noting the incorrect products were found at a Richmond warehouse and disposed of before any were shipped to stores.

Hexo was concerned some of its high-THC oral spray had been mislabelled as being high in CBD. THC is the intoxicating cannabinoid in cannabis, while CBD use is commonly associated with relaxation rather than a high.

B.C. Cannabis sent an email on Nov. 20 to anyone who purchased the CBD spray, informing them of the mixup.

“No customer ever got any of the mislabelled product,” Lake said. “We are extremely confident in that statement.”

B.C. Cannabis is standing by Hexo.

“After having carried out a comprehensive examination of inventory, Hexo determined that no mislabelled product was sold to customers,” reads an emailed statement to KTW from the LDB.

Neither Hexo nor the B.C. government, both listed as defendants on Webster’s lawsuit, have replied with filings of their own.

Gagnon said he expects to see a response filed within weeks.

None of Webster’s allegations have been proven in court.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Mobile breast cancer screening coming to Creston

To book a screening mammogram call 1-800-663-9203. A doctor’s referral is not required.

Call a foul on cancer with the Pink Whistle Campaign

Local basketball referees are raising money for cancer research

Free farm succession planning workshop in Creston

The one-day workshop provides an overview of the succession planning process followed by detailed presentations by farm succession experts in accounting, law, insurance, and financing.

Teachers’ Association protests committee appointment process

Newly elected school trustee Al Gribbin’s request to sit on the Kootenay… Continue reading

Biologists discover another female calf in depleted South Purcell Mountain Caribou herd

Calf will be moved to Revelstoke maternity pens, then released

Trudeau’s principal secretary, Gerald Butts, resigns amid SNC-Lavalin furor

Butts categorically denies the accusation that he or anyone else in the PMO improperly pressured former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould

Lost a ring? This B.C. man will find it for you

Chris Turner founded The Ring Finders, an international directory of metal detector hobbyists

Poverty coalition has high hopes for B.C. poverty reduction strategy

Funding allocation expected to be released with 2019 budget

East Kootenay mine deaths prompt safety initiatives

Teck produces educational video, introduces new procedures after contractor drowns at Fording River

‘How did we get here?’: B.C. mom of transplant recipient worries about measles outbreaks

Addison, 7, cannot get a live vaccine because she has a heart transplant

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh calls for public inquiry over SNC-Lavalin questions

Vancouver member of Parliament Jody Wilson-Raybould resigned from cabinet last week

Canadian airlines waiting for guidance from Ottawa over X gender option

Major U.S. airlines said they will change their process so passengers can identify themselves along non-binary lines

Moose Hide campaign takes message to Canadian schools

Campaign launches new K-12 education platform

‘Violent’ B.C. man wanted on Canada-wide warrant

Prince George man with ties to Vernon sought by police

Most Read