A detailed close-up of Kate Tupper’s “Boreal Underground,” a 3-D resin and fibre botanical mandala on display at the Tilted Brick’s “View Point” exhibit. Photo: Aaron Hemens

A detailed close-up of Kate Tupper’s “Boreal Underground,” a 3-D resin and fibre botanical mandala on display at the Tilted Brick’s “View Point” exhibit. Photo: Aaron Hemens

Manipulated, stitched and dyed: Explore the versatility of fibre art at Creston exhibit

The “View Point: A Fibre-Based Exploration of the Natural World” exhibit features the fibre works of 20 artists — all of whom are women — from throughout the Columbia Basin Trust region

A new art exhibit on display at Creston’s Tilted Brick Gallery is inviting gallery-goers to discover the versatility of fibres and see how they can be utilized to create varying pieces of art.

From a dress made from cheesecloth and linen to a giant 3-D resin and fibre botanical mandala, the “View Point: A Fibre-Based Exploration of the Natural World” exhibit features the fibre works of 20 artists — all of whom are women — from throughout the Columbia Basin Trust region.

Seathra Bell's "Rusted" piece, as seen from below, is a dress made from cheesecloth and linen. Photo: Aaron Hemens
Kate Tupper's "Boreal Underground," a 3-D resin and fibre botanical mandala on display at the Tilted Brick's "View Point" exhibit. Photo: Aaron Hemens

“These talented artists are going to different levels of exploring how fibre can be treated, manipulated, dyed, stitched,” said Linda Macullo, who co-curated the exhibit alongside Anne Fetterly. “It’s very exciting to see all the different processes they’ve put into this.”

When the call for submissions went out this past fall, artists were asked to create something that “speaks to the natural world and our relationship with nature and this place we call home.” The use of fibre in their work, as well as the different techniques, viewpoints and perspectives incorporated, were also considered in the curating process.

"Covid Dolls" made from wool, clay, buttons and various assorted "stash" items. Created by Carmen Ditzler, Gina Ebelher, Becca Musso and Andrea Revoy.

“We definitely wanted diversity. We wanted people to be able to see how fibre can be manipulated, dyed, stitched in ways that you don’t normally see,” said Macullo. “We want people to come in and say ‘that’s not this’ or ‘that’s not that,’ or just squeal with glee. We’re very happy that that’s been the reaction so far; people discovering ways what you can do with fabric.”

She added that the comments received from gallery-goers about the exhibit, which opened on March 12, have been rewarding.

“For many people, art to them is only paintings. We wanted the opportunity to show that there is artistry in fibre,” she said. “This is what we wanted to show people, to showcase. Fibre isn’t just the clothes you put on your back.”

Until April 24, the free exhibit is open to viewing every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Macullo said that she hopes that visitors continue to experience the joy of discovery.

Kendra Lee and Merilyn Arms's "See the Light" piece, created from linen tablecloth, organza, stitch drawing and sun printing. Photo: Aaron Hemens

“Enjoy the discovery of something they perhaps did not know existed before. It’s an introduction. Hopefully, what people will get from this, is to look at things differently,” she said.

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email: aaron.hemens@crestonvalleyadvance.ca


@aaron_hemens
aaron.hemens@crestonvalleyadvance.ca

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