Workers at airports, among other fields, will get more time off after a federal labour reform in September 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Blinch

Labour reform gives workers more breaks, leaves in federally regulated fields

Government says workers will be able to take time off more easily

Workers in federally-regulated fields across Canada will now be more easily able to take time off for personal and medical issues.

As of Sept. 1, employees working in interprovincial and international transportation fields like railways, buses, pipelines and airports, fields like grain processing, banking, uranium, telecommunications and broadcasting, Crown corporations and First Nations band councils will get general holiday pay , medical leave, maternity and parental leave, leave related to critical illness and leave related to death or disappearance of a child as of their first day at work.

Other changes include:

  • personal leave up to five days, including 3 days with pay
  • family violence leave up to 10 days, with five days paid
  • leave for traditional Indigenous practices of up to 5 unpaid days

  • expanded bereavement leave from three to five days, three of them paid

  • unpaid leave for court or jury duty

  • new breaks and rest periods (medical and nursing breaks, work breaks); and

  • increased annual vacation entitlements (three weeks after five years of service, four weeks after 10 years of service)

  • medical leave (covering personal illness or accident, organ/tissue donation and medical appointments)


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Interior Health will not expand Police and Crisis Team

Southeast Division Chief Superintendent Brad Haugli asked IH to expand the program

RDCK: spring flooding financial relief available

The provincial funds are for those affected by flooding in May and early June

School District 8: about 25% of students returned to schools last month

The number of students who participated in part-time classes was below the provincial average

QUIZ: Put your knowledge of Canada to the test

How much do you know about our country?

Province offers support to safeguard Kootenay fruit pickers

All seasonal fruit pickers will need to take an online COVID-19 awareness course

VIDEO: Musqueam Chief captures captivating footage of bald eagle catching meal

‘This is why we have chosen to live here since time immemorial,’ Chief Wayne Sparrow’s nephew says

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Liberal party finished 2019 having spent $43 million, raised $42 million

All political parties had until midnight June 30 to submit their financial reports for last year

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

Most Read