Throughout December, RCMP conducted CounterAttack road checks as police worked to keep roads free of impaired drivers. (BLACK PRESS file photo)

Throughout December, RCMP conducted CounterAttack road checks as police worked to keep roads free of impaired drivers. (BLACK PRESS file photo)

‘You can’t make this stuff up’: Stories from the B.C. CounterAttack campaign

Amusing, yes, but a reminder impaired driving affects ability to drive and to make good decisions

B.C. Mounties recently wrapped up their winter campaign to counter impaired driving, generating new material for the “we don’t make this stuff up” file.

Cpl. Mike Halskov, with BC RCMP traffic services, said Wednesday that police all across the province caught people getting behind the wheel while impaired, including a few repeat offenders.

Here’s a look at a few of the cases:

RELATED: Driver arrested after asking Nanaimo RCMP for advice on avoiding road checks

Driver tries to school officer on roadside laws

A man in Cranbrook found out the hard way that having a history of impaired driving didn’t necessarily mean they were an expert on the particular criminal code offence.

According to police, the man refused to give a breath sample after being pulled over by a “seasoned officer,” insisting that this wasn’t illegal and all the Mountie could do was issue a 90-day roadside prohibition.

“The officer chose to follow the law rather than the driver’s advice and charged him criminally with refusing to provide breath samples,” Halskov said.

Shortly after the driver was dropped off at home, he called the local detachment to report his vehicle stolen.

“Don’t drive impaired and then try to educate the officer on the law – we know our authorities and what we are doing.”

Impaired driver goes through road block twice

On Vancouver Island, officers in the Ladysmith area encountered a driver who came through a road check not once, but twice.

In the first instance, the driver stopped for the officer, but drove off when asked to pull to the side of the road.

“For reasons that can only be attributed to the driver’s impairment, he came through the road check a second time, stopping long enough to hand his driver’s licence to the officer before fleeing again,” Halskov said.

Instead of pursuing the individual in a chase, the officer sent a driving report to RoadSafetyBC. A few days later, the officer attended the driver’s home and served him with numerous violation tickets, as well as a four-month driving prohibition.

“The lesson: Police recommend following directions at a road check but, if you choose not to, the consequences may be worse than if you had,” Halskov said.

While these stories cause a chuckle or two, RCMP are urging all British Columbians to not drive while impaired and report any suspected driving under the influence to police.

“As we have seen many times in the past, the consequences of poor decision making when it comes to impaired driving can be deadly,” Halskov said.

RELATED: Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer


@AlstrT
editor@campbellrivermirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

RCMPTraffic

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Photo: pixabay.com
Creston’s Lectric Avenue Electronics warns of online scammers after spike in hacks

In the past week, 10 to 12 customers have called in or stopped by the store requiring assistance after their gadgets were corrupted and bank accounts compromised

Robert Klein holds up one of his stone oil lamp creations. Photo: Aaron Hemens
Creston artist turns rocks into candles, vases and more

It was around 25 years ago when Robert Klein got the idea to create stone oil lamps from rocks, after a geologist presented him with two one-inch core samples

A nurse performs a test on a patient at a drive-in COVID-19 clinic in Montreal, on Wednesday, October 21, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
36 new cases of COVID-19, one death in Interior Health

The number of active cases in the region is at 366

Kootenay-Columbia MP Rob Morrison. File photo
COMMON’S CORNER: Challenging the government on vaccine availability and more

The first of a quarterly column from Kootenay-Columbia MP Rob Morrison

A health worker holds a vial of AstraZeneca vaccine to be administered to members of the police at a COVID-19 vaccination center in Mainz, Germany, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021. (Andreas Arnold/dpa via AP)
43 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health

368 cases in the region remain active

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry head for the B.C. legislature press theatre to give a daily update on the COVID-19 pandemic, April 6, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. nears 300,000 COVID-19 vaccinations, essential workers next

564 new cases, four deaths, no new outbreaks Thursday

Walter Gretzky father of hockey hall-of-famer Wayne Gretzky waves to fans as the Buffalo Sabres play against the Toronto Maple Leafs during third period NHL hockey action in Toronto on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky, father of the Great One, dies at 82

Canada’s hockey dad had battled Parkinson’s disease and other health issues

Kelowna General Hospital (File photo)
Second death reported in Kelowna General Hospital COVID-19 outbreak

A total of seven cases have been identified at the hospital: six patients and one staff

Municipal Affairs Minister Josie Osborne speaks in the B.C. legislature, March 4, 2021. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals, NDP sing in harmony on local election reforms

Bill regulates paid canvassers, allows people in condo buildings

(National Emergency Management Agency)
No tsunami risk to B.C. from powerful New Zealand earthquake: officials

An 8.1 magnitude earthquake shook the north of New Zealand Thursday morning

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

(AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
Pandemic stress, isolation key factors as to why Canadians turned to cannabis, alcohol

Study found that isolation played key role in Canadians’ substance use

Grand Forks’ Gary Smith stands in front of his Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster float. Photo: Submitted
Grand Forks’ Flying Spaghetti Monster leader still boiling over driver’s licence photo

Gary Smith, head of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster of B.C., said he has since spoken to lawyers

Most Read