Mill creek floods properties in Kelowna. - Image Credit: Jen Zielinski

Flood assistance available

The province has announced financial assistance is now available for Central Interior flooding victims

Disaster Financial Assistance is now available to eligible B.C. residents impacted by the damaging flooding that began on Friday.

The B.C. Government notes financial assistance is available to home owners, residential tenants, small business owners, farmers, charitable organizations and local government bodies who were unable to obtain insurance to cover these disaster-related losses.

Applications for this provincial funding in the Thompson-Nicola Regional District, the North Okanagan Regional District, the Columbia Shuswap Regional District, the Okanagan-Similkameen Regional District and the Central Okanagan Regional District must be submitted to Emergency Management BC (EMBC) by August 5, 2017.

British Columbians can access the application at: http://www.gov.bc.ca/disasterfinancialassistance

Facts about Disaster Financial Assistance:

  • Financial assistance is provided for each accepted claim at 80 per cent of the amount of total eligible damage that exceeds $1,000, to a maximum claim of $300,000.
  • Claims may be made in more than one category (e.g., home owner and farm owner).
  • A homeowner or residential tenant must show that the home is their principal residence.
  • Seasonal or recreational properties, hot tubs, patios, pools, garden tools, landscaping, luxury items (like jewelry, fur coats and collectibles), and recreational items (like bicycles) are not eligible for assistance.
  • Small business owners and farm owners must demonstrate it is their primary source of income. Owners of damaged rental property must apply and qualify as a small business.
  • Charitable organizations must provide a benefit of service to the community at large.
  • Assistance is also available to local governments for:
  • Emergency response measures authorized by EMBC by response task number, including incremental costs associated with their Emergency Operations Centre. Financial assistance is provided for each accepted response claim at 100%. Completed response claim summaries and supporting documentation must be sent to the respective EMBC Regional Office.
  • Recovery measures to replace essential materials and rebuild or replace essential public infrastructures to the condition it was in before the disaster. Assistance is provided for each accepted recovery claim at 80% of the amount of total eligible damage that exceeds $1,000.

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