The conference will leverage local subject-matter experts, researchers, policy-makers and traditional knowledge keepers to deliver fresh perspectives on the Columbia River’s future. (CBT file)

Columbia Basin Trust hosting transboundary conference on Columbia River

Discuss the future of the Columbia River at the conference in Kimberley.

Columbia Basin Trust is hosting the Columbia Basin Transboundary Conference: One River, One Future, at the Kimberley Conference Centre from September 12 to 14, 2019. Online registration is now open at transboundaryriverconference.org. The cost to attend is $199.

The international conference will address key issues related to the future of the Columbia River, its ecosystem, management, and international implications. It is co-hosted by Columbia Basin Trust (the Trust) and Northwest Power and Conservation Council (the Council).

READ MORE: Trust gives five projects over $2.5 million through Ecosystem Enhancement Program

“With a conference focus on collaboration, culture, and conversation, attendees will explore a wide range of contemporary topics related to the Columbia River,” said Rick Jensen, Chair, Board of Directors Columbia Basin Trust and conference co-chair in a press release. “Our aim is for participants to have discussions and learn from one another, and advance our collective approach to being stewards of the river that binds us.”

Through break-out sessions, interactive workshops, presentations, networking events and a guided regional tour, conference participants will share perspectives and build an understanding of current issues, emerging challenges, innovations and integrated approaches with respect to the Columbia River.

The conference will leverage local subject-matter experts, researchers, policy-makers and traditional knowledge keepers to deliver fresh perspectives on the Columbia River’s future. There will also be a focus on celebrating the rich and diverse arts and culture in the Columbia River Basin.

“We are excited about this conference because it will bring together not only experts in the critical issues we have identified, but also many other interested people from both sides of the border and provide all of us an opportunity to actively listen, learn, and strengthen our understanding,” said Jennifer Anders, the Council Chair and conference co-chair with Trust Chair Rick Jensen.

“Columbia Lake and the headwaters of the Columbia River are within the homelands of the Ktunaxa people. We are looking forward to welcoming and hosting people from the entirety of the Columbia river system, here in the headwaters” said Nasuakin Joe Pierre, Aaq’am.

If you’re a scientist, policy-maker, subject-matter expert representing energy, economic, and environmental perspectives, including the perspectives of State, Provincial, Federal, U.S. Native American Tribal and Canadian First Nation governments, make plans to attend this conference and discuss:

Renegotiation of the Columbia River Treaty; Reintroduction of salmon to the upper Columbia River; Impacts of and response to invasive species; Energy issues including hydropower, energy efficiency (conservation), transmission and renewable resources; Climate change-related impacts, and; International water governance issues and opportunities.



corey.bullock@kimberleybulletin.com

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