College of the Rockies unveils 2015-2020 strategic plan in Creston

Web Lead

  • Apr. 8, 2015 2:00 p.m.

A page from the College of the Rockies' new strategic plan

With a mission “to transform lives and enrich communities through the power of education,” the College of the Rockies revealed its 2015-2020 strategic plan to an invited Creston audience yesterday.

The strategic plan, introduced by president and CEO David Walls, was the culmination of a yearlong process that included consultation with communities, students and staff to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.

“We’re working to make sure we’re working with the communities we serve,” said Walls.

The mission statement changed little from its pervious incarnation — “If anything, we reinforced it by the verbs we put in there,” Walls said — but the plan’s vision statement is totally new: “To create and deliver the most personal student experience in Canada.”

That will be determined by the ultimate goals of recruiting and retaining more students, better preparing graduates for the job market and better preparing students for the next stage of their education.

A new brand promise, “Rocky Mountain inspired. Small college proud,” is among the keys to making that happen.

“Rocky Mountain inspired” means, among other things, that the college reaches higher, doesn’t compromise on the quality of education and delivers programs based on the region’s strengths. “Small college proud” highlights personal attention and quick decisions on things that matter.

With provincial funding declining, competition from larger institutions and the young population in the area decreasing (the average age among COTR’s 2,500 students is 24), the college could simply cut services to keep functioning.

“Eventually, we’ll get smaller and less relevant, and clearly we don’t want to do that,” Walls said. “We want to continue to grow as a college.”

With a main campus in Cranbrook, and regional campuses in Creston, Fernie, Golden, Invermere, and Kimberley, building relationships is a significant part of maintaining awareness in the communities the college serves. Appreciation of the people, land and culture is among the four key values outlined in the plan.

There is room for the plan to grow, Walls said, noting that most strategic plans last less than five years. Changes will come as the plan is implemented and goals are reached.

“It’s not going to sit on a shelf,” he said. “We’re cascading it into all our divisions.”

Developing the strategic plan was a key mandate for Walls, who succeeded Dr. Nick Rubidge, president for 12 years, in 2013.

“It’s like having a map,” said Creston’s Dave Handy, who serves as COTR board chair. “You have to have somewhere to go.”

The plan, available to download at www.cotr.bc.ca/strategic-plan, has already been well received.

“I think the college is engaged,” he said. “I get that sense from the faculty I’ve gotten to know and from management.”

Just Posted

Landlord-tenant disputes highlight this week’s police blotter

Police received 54 calls for assistance from November 6 to November 12.

No Stone Left Alone honours Lower Kootenay Band veterans

Veterans and service members joined Yaqan Nukiy School students in a ceremony of song and reflection on Nov. 8 to honour Lower Kootenay Band veterans at St. Peter’s Cemetery.

Kootenay employers ready to meet job seekers at Black Press career fair

Dozens of companies will attend the event on Nov. 15 at the Ktunaxa Nation Building in Cranbrook

B.C. Legions in need of young members to continue aiding veterans into the future

Lest we forget what thousands of men and women did to fight for Canada’s freedoms – but without new membership, many Legion chapters face dwindling numbers

Creston postal workers go on 24-hour strike

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) went on strike in Creston… Continue reading

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Kuhnhackl scores 2 odd goals as Isles dump Canucks 5-2

Vancouver drops second game in two nights

Stink at B.C. school prompts complaints of headaches, nausea

Smell at Abbotsford school comes from unauthorized composting operation

Fear of constitutional crisis escalates in U.S.; Canadians can relate

Some say President Donald Trump is leading the U.S. towards a crisis

B.C.-based pot producer Tilray reports revenue surge, net loss

Company remains excited about ‘robust’ cannabis industry

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Feds pledge money for young scientists, but funding for in-house research slips

Canada’s spending on science is up almost 10 per cent since the Liberals took office, but spending on in-house research is actually down

Disabled boy has ‘forgiven’ bullies who walked on him in stream, mom says

A Cape Breton teen who has cerebral palsy was told to lie in a stream as other kids walked over him

Letters shed light on state of mind of B.C. mom accused of daughter’s murder

Trial of South Surrey mother Lisa Batstone begins in BC Supreme Court

Most Read