A judge issued $8,000 worth of fines after a man wounded a deer, out of season and without a licence, and left the animal to suffer. (File photo)

A judge issued $8,000 worth of fines after a man wounded a deer, out of season and without a licence, and left the animal to suffer. (File photo)

B.C. man fined $8,000 for wounding deer in stomach in Princeton

In addition to the fines, Li Tan was placed under a four-year hunting prohibition

A Richmond man was fined $8,000 last month for wounding a deer at the Princeton Castle Resort.

Princeton circuit court heard the animal — a mule deer buck without antlers — lived for some time with its organs spilling from its abdomen before it was shot by a neighbouring resident to end its suffering.

Li Tan was charged with seven offences under the Wildlife Act.

He pleaded guilty to four counts and asked to be sentenced immediately. However, the session took an unusual turn when Li repeatedly told Judge Gregory Koturbash that he either did not commit the crimes or did not understand that he committed the crimes.

“I just want to explain,” said Li.

Li’s testimony, and comments from court officers, were interpreted through a Mandarin-English translator, who participated via telephone.

Court heard that on Nov. 6, 2018, Li was working at the resort when he sighted the deer.

Related: Hunters face charges for illegal kill near Princeton

He had a crossbow in his vehicle and one arrow, which he shot at the deer, hitting it in the stomach.

“But the deer kept running,” said Li.

Along with a companion, he then drove 4.2 kilometres to Princeton Outdoor Supply, where he purchased three more arrows. He returned to the resort and shot them all in an unsuccessful attempt to make the kill.

Li retrieved the animal after it eventually died, cut it into pieces which he put into bags, and drove to Richmond where he disposed of them in garbage cans.

Three days later he purchased a deer tag, cancelled the Nov. 6 date, and afterwards produced that documentation to a conservation officer.

Li was initially represented by duty counsel Paul Varga, but partway through the proceedings chose to speak for himself.

By that time the defence and Crown had agreed on the plea, a statement of facts and a joint submission for sentencing.

Li pleaded guilty to hunting without consideration, hunting without a license, wounding wildlife out of season, and failing to report wounding wildlife.

Afterwards, he made statements contradicting the agreement.

“I cannot be sure it was me who wounded the deer,” he said, pointing out there were no witnesses so it was not possible to know who shot the animal.

That prompted Koturbash to ask: “Is there an appropriate word for B.S. in Mandarin?”

Arguing in a loud voice Li said: “Nobody can prove if I shot at a wounded deer or a healthy one.”

Koturbash responded: “Do you think there was somebody behind you on a grassy knoll, that it was somebody else?”

The judge insisted Li admit to the offences for the record, or he would be forced to send the matter to trial.

In addition to the fines, Li was placed under a four-year hunting prohibition.

Jiang Luan, who drove Li to the Princeton hunting store, faced four counts under the Wildlife Act, however Crown agreed to dismiss those charges.

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Andre Robert won $500,000 through a Lotto Extra ticket on Dec. 23, 2020. Photo: Jeanne d’Arc Allard
Creston resident wins $500k through Lotto ticket

“I was surprised. I wasn’t sure if it was true or not.”

Community mental health workers are in high demand, and a new program at Selkirk College will provide opportunities in this field. File Photo
Selkirk College to train community mental health workers

Twelve students will complete two courses enabling them to work in health and human services

Dr. Cori Lausen, bat specialist, has questions about logging in an unusual bat habitat near Beasley. Photo: Submitted
Kaslo biologist questions logging at unique West Kootenay bat site

Dr. Cori Lausen, a bat specialist, studies a population of bats above Beasley

Robbie Campbell lost his livelihood when the pandemic shut down Shambhala Music Festival. Instead, he spent part of 2020 working on a children’s book called Tulip that is now available. Photo: Submitted
In a lousy year, a Kootenay man was saved by a pink T-rex

Robbie Campbell became a children’s author after the pandemic cost him his livelihood

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
253 new COVID-19 cases, 4 more deaths in Interior Health over the weekend

More than 1,000 cases in the region remain active

Syringe is prepared with one of B.C.’s first vials of Pfizer vaccine to prevent COVID-19, Victoria, Dec. 22, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 caseload stays steady with 465 more Tuesday

No new outbreaks in health care facilities, 12 more deaths

Cranbrook Food Bank coordinator Deanna Kemperman, Potluck Cafe Society executive director Naved Noorani and Sunshine Coast Community Services Society executive director Catherine Leach join B.C.’s new Municipal Affairs Minister Josie Osborne on a video call about B.C. gaming grants, Jan. 19, 2021. (B.C. government)
B.C. gaming grants reorganized for COVID-19 priorities

Minister highlights community kitchens, food banks

(Pixabay photo)
‘Cocaine bananas’ arrive at Kelowna grocery stores after mix up from Colombia: RCMP

Kelowna RCMP recently concluded an international drug investigation after finding cocaine in local grocers’ banana shipments in 2019

A new video from NCCIH and BC Northern Health titled ‘Healing in Pandemic Times: Indigenous Peoples, Stigma and COVID-19’ was animated by Joanne Gervais. (Photo Provided By: NCCIH Archives)
VIDEO: Stigma against Indigenous people is a ‘social sickness’

A new short animated video is aiming to educate the public on the stigmatization

A pinniped was attacked by an unseen predator off the shores of Dallas Road Monday night. (Courtesy of Steffani Cameron)
VIDEO: Seal hunting, not being hunted in video shot off Victoria waterfront

Victoria woman captures footage of pinniped activity off Dallas Road

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau provides an update on the COVID-19 pandemic from Rideau Cottage in Ottawa on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau provides an update on the COVID-19 pandemic from Rideau Cottage in Ottawa on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Trudeau vows to keep up the fight to sway U.S. on merits of Keystone XL pipeline

Canada’s pitch to the Biden team has framed Keystone XL as a more environmentally friendly project than original

The British Columbia Hotel Association (BCHA) sent out a sharply worded release late last week, in which it noted that the Tourism Industry Association of BC recently obtained a ‘legal opinion’ on the matter (Alex Passini photo)
Hotel associations push back against any potential ban on inter-provincial, non-essential travel restrictions

B.C. Premier John Horgan is seeking legal advice on banning non-essential travel

JaHyung Lee, “Canada’s oldest senior” at 110 years old, received his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. He lives at Amenida Seniors Community in Newton. (Submitted photo: Amenida Seniors Community)
COVID rapid tests in long-term care key during vaccine rollout: B.C. care providers

‘Getting kits into the hands of care providers should be a top priority,’ says former Health Minister

Most Read