Skiers in the Jumbo Valley

Wildsight hosting ‘Jumbo Wild’ film screening in Creston

Web Lead

This fall, Patagonia released Jumbo Wild, a gripping, hourlong documentary film by Sweetgrass Productions telling a true story of the decades-long battle over the future of British Columbia’s iconic Jumbo Valley, highlighting the tension between protection of wilderness and the backcountry experience and ever-increasing development interests in wild places.

The film will screen at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 14 at the Tivoli Theatre. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

A large-scale proposed ski resort threatens the rich wilderness of British Columbia’s Purcell Range — a revered backcountry ski and snowboarding destination with world-class terrain, sacred ground for local First Nations people, and part of one of North America’s most important grizzly bear corridors.

Directed by Nick Waggoner and Sweetgrass Productions, Jumbo Wild documents the epic tug of war — between community members, First Nations and conservationists, resort developers and politicians — over the future of Jumbo. Set against a backdrop of incredible backcountry ski and snowboard footage, Jumbo Wild features unprecedented documentation of all sides of a divisive issue bringing the passionate local fight to protect the Jumbo Valley to life for a global audience for the first time.

To coincide with the release of Jumbo Wild, Patagonia and local partners at Wildsight are encouraging the world to get involved by saying no to development and advocating for permanent protection for the Jumbo Valley, a place with enormous cultural and ecological value. An eight-minute short version of the film, available now at Patagonia.com, features a call to action, and Patagonia is using its international network and marketing channels to share the message widely.

Since 2012, Patagonia has provided financial support to Wildsight in its activism efforts to “keep Jumbo wild”. The campaign achieved a significant victory this summer when the environmental certificate was rescinded, but the next step is protecting the Jumbo Valley forever.

The Jumbo Glacier Resort is a proposed four-season “European-style” expansive ski resort with thousands of beds in the heart of the wild, remote Jumbo Valley and providing access to several glaciers. There are currently eight ski resorts — Panorama, Kimberley, Fernie, Kicking Horse, Revelstoke, Whitewater, Nakiska, Norquay, Sunshine and Lake Louise — within a four hour radius of Invermere, none of them are running at capacity.

For 24 years, local residents, skiers, riders, alpinists, grizzly bear advocates and the Ktunaxa Nation have strongly opposed the corporatization of their beloved backcountry wilderness. Developers say their proposed year-round ski resort would be a snow rider’s dream, but Kootenay residents — including many who love to ski and support local ski resorts — don’t want it.

To the Ktunaxa Nation, the Jumbo Valley is known as Qat’muk, home of the grizzly bear spirit. The area is of profound spiritual and cultural importance and the resort would undermine beliefs and practices at the core of Ktunaxa culture and identity.

In addition, the Jumbo Valley is recognized internationally as a vital part of one of North America’s most important wildlife corridors. Grizzlies depend on this connected habitat to maintain healthy populations in the region and beyond. The Jumbo Valley is one of only two remaining areas in North America where bears can freely roam between Canada and the U.S. If built, Jumbo Glacier Resort would fragment a critical section of this corridor, potentially leading to reduced grizzly populations, locally, regionally and even continentally.

Visit www.keepitwild.ca or www.patagonia.com/jumbowild for more information.

—WILDSIGHT

Just Posted

Public art committee thrives

No news is good news for the Creston Valley Public Art Connection.… Continue reading

Lister celebrates centennial in June with weekend event

Past and present Lister residents are invited to take part in the celebration.

LETTER: We are committed to the valley’s fruit growers

Honey Bee Zen Apiaries Ltd., can assure orchardists that we will be able to pollinate large portion orchards.

Creston Museum gets multiculturalism grant

A $4,000 multiculturalism grant will allow the Creston Museum to celebrate the… Continue reading

Cheetahs will not prosper in Creston: permit rejected for two big cats

Earl Pfeifer owns two cheetahs, one of which escaped in December 2015

Sparks fly as SUV speeds down wrong side of Highway 1 trying to flee RCMP

Captured on video, the vehicle headed westbound against oncoming traffic before crashing

Trudeau calls May 6 byelection for B.C. riding of Nanaimo-Ladysmith

The riding opened up when Sheila Malcolmson resigned in January

B.C. VIEWS: The hijacking of our education system gathers speed

Children taught to strike and shout fringe far-left demands

Judges on Twitter? Ethical guidance for those on the bench under review

Canadian judges involvement in community life are among issues under review

Calgary captain has 3 points as Flames torch Canucks 3-1

Giordano leads way as Alberta side cracks 100-point plateau

1,300 cruise ship passengers rescued by helicopter amid storm off Norway’s coast

Rescue teams with helicopters and boats were sent to evacuate the cruise ship under extremely difficult circumstances

B.C. university to offer first graduate program on mindfulness in Canada

University of the Fraser Valley says the mostly-online program focuses on self-care and well being

Province announces $18.6 million for B.C. Search and Rescue

The funding, spread over three years, to pay for operations, equipment, and training

Late-season wave of the flu makes its round in B.C.

BC Centre for Disease Control reported 50 per cent jump in flu cases in first weeks of March

Most Read